Original post

I’d appreciate input on this topic.

You do not need to understand it.

Designing structs around memory alignment is an advanced optimisation technique.

The essence is, if those fields of a struct you need, always start at a location that matches your memory alignment, then accessing will be faster.

Holloway suggested I read a certain book, and that’s one of the first things she mentions. Let me see if I can find the title of the book.
The Ultimate Go Study Guide by Hoanh An

I’ll also find the excerpt.
I’m having trouble doing this. One reason is because I am on my phone right now. I neglected to bring my computer charger with me :weary:.

I’m going to start another topic where I specifically ask questions from the book.

When I study something, for example, the book that Holloway suggested, my procedure is to study the definition of every word I encounter. Is there something wrong with this approach?

You can not enter any rabbit hole.

Try to keep the things simple. Try to accept prior knowledge and understanding of terms and reuse it as long as the simplified understanding doesn’t hold anymore.

Then you can look things up and try to deepen your understanding of them.

But if you really follow every rabbit hole, you will be overburdened by definitions of complex things, that you simply don’t need as a beginner, and those things that you need to understand the task and term at hand right now, fall off by this process, either because you overread them, or because you forget their definition while beeing in another rabbit hole and learning about froobnickels.

That is so true. So should I wait to read the book?